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usnjay

Although this would be a great development that would greatly increase the supply of freshwater, there will still be many areas without it. We have a plentiful supply of freshwater now, the expense is transporting it. Of course, when all the oceans are a source of cheap fresh water, many more people will have access.

Also the 'fresh water' supplies of many impoverished regions are diseased and filthy, so this will help. Combined with a bacteria killing pill it would make their water supply safe as will.

It's funny I'm reading this as I'm listening to NPR. I'm reading about improving conditions in the world while listening to how horrible the world is becoming (Off topic, but interesting).

regards,

GK

usnjay,

This would not just be used on ocean water, but even for the water of large lakes (the Caspain Sea, Lake Victoria, Great Salt Lake, etc.)

Also note that the filter is so small that even salt molecules don't make it through. Filtering out bacteria is already happening as a result.

This really could save billions for corporations, and save the lives of millions from dehydration, etc.

usnjay

You know, I read 7 molecules and for some reason was thinking of 7 cells, so obviously yes that would also purify the water. Call me Dr. Evil.

Dr. Evil: "Why make trillions when we could make...billions?"
Scott: "A trillion is more than a billion, numbnuts."

gregoftheweb

So...what if this could be deployed on a large scale? Could you irrigate the Sahara from the Atlantic?

Baja from the Pacific?

Western Australia from the Indian Ocean?

GK

gregoftheweb,

Not in the near future, but it will slash the cost of water that is desalinated, bottled up, and transported to people who then buy it.

If a 5 gallon jug of drinking water drops from $2 to $1 because of this, many millions more could afford it.

In the more distant future, maybe this can be scaled up to filtering facilites a mile wide, that do billions of gallons a day. Then, what you suggest might be possible. But it would not be before 2040.

JAM

Of course the easiest thing for a desert dwelling tribesman to do would be to simply pee into the filter and drink the water that comes out. No logistics required.

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