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jeffolie

OT Reversal of Research in Energy Technology...


In fiscal 2006, Congress cut the Department of Energy's budget for all renewable energy programs by more than 35 percent. As a result, DOE, which funds NREL as well as other national labs, has cut the total amount it will give the lab in Golden. NREL does research in wind, biomass, solar and hydrogen technologies.
"We are going to face a very difficult year at NREL," said Bob Noun, NREL's deputy associate director. "This is a real paradox.

jeffolie

Broadband without electricity - no way

People Power

The major impediments to economic growth in India are in the infrastructure sector, where one finds glaring shortcomings in the state of roads, ports, electricity, and the like. There is also a crying need to improve the social infrastructure, such as the country’s education and health facilities.

Per capita consumption of electricity in India is 1/20th of per capita consumption of electricity in the United States. Over half of India’s nearly 200 million households do not have electricity. Around 70 percent rely on traditional, non-commercial fuel such as firewood, cow-dung cakes, and other agricultural waste to cook their food. Most Indians experience power outages as routine blackouts, either for a few hours every day or for days at a time.

GK

Check out what the rate of improvement in electricity distribution is...

Plus, even if 30% don't have electricity in India, there are still 69% of the population that do have electricity but no broadband. Those are the ones who will rapidly see BB available to them over the next 7 years.

alzaebo

A new trend in India is the use of "phone ladies".

They get a cell phone thru microloan programs, and provide phone service to the local village(s).

Better for the farmer to pay her for the call, than to take a daylong train ride to the city, where the brokers would still lie about the price of cotton.

alzaebo

also available thru microloans- a solar strip charger or an old car battery and a charger

Eric

That is absolutely not true! There will still be over the air TV signals. They will only change form. Rabit ears will still be required to get local digital TV signals. Do the research.

gaiaonline gold

A new trend in India is the use of "phone ladies".

They get a cell phone thru microloan programs, and provide phone service to the local village(s).

Better for the farmer to pay her for the call, than to take a daylong train ride to the city, where the brokers would still lie about the price of cotton.

aion kinah

That is absolutely not true! There will still be over the air TV signals. They will only change form. Rabit ears will still be required to get local digital TV signals. Do the research.

Anderson

Hey,
Thanks! Great post you have written on "The End of Rabbit Ears, a Billion more Broadband users". Really I can say that your post is very informative, I'll come across your blog again when you will update it with new.
Thanks,
Anderson
http://www.mobilemark.com/

Geoman

"Prediction : By 2013, Asia and Latin America will jointly have 900 million people exclusively subscribing to wireless broadband services through cellphone-like devices, enjoying speeds of 5 Mbps or more. 80% of these people have no Internet access, not even dial-up, today"

It is 2019 - 4.3 billion people use the internet. That is 56.3 percent of the world’s population, and a 1,104% growth rate since 2000. Global average internet speed is 17.5 Mbps. So the speed goal has definitely been achieved.

The average smartphone connection in Asia-Pacific now uses around 1Gb of data per month. China has the highest number of internet users in the world, with over 746 million users. India has the world's second highest number of internet users, with 699 million users connected.

China has 378 million broadband subscriptions. Japan 40 million. Korea 21 million, India 17 million. Brazil 28 million. Argentina 8 million, Columbia 6 million. Add them all up and I don't think we get to 900 million. More like 600 million. Still a huge number, from virtually zero in 2006. No doubt 900 million is just a few years away.

By the way - this is changing so fast that even statistics 1-2 years old are incorrect and off by millions. I could be wrong here.

Kartik Gada

Hello Geoman,

China has 378 million broadband subscriptions. Japan 40 million. Korea 21 million, India 17 million. Brazil 28 million. Argentina 8 million, Columbia 6 million. Add them all up and I don't think we get to 900 million.

Those numbers are for landline only.

The article focuses on mobile, since that was expected to grow much faster in places where there was never a suitable wired infrastructure. India has only 17-30 million landline broadband subscriptions, but over 400 million wireless broadband subscriptions (a classic leapfrogging).

See here for landline vs. mobile compared side-by-side (even as only a portion of mobile are broadband) :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_broadband_Internet_subscriptions

Here is the smartphone list :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_smartphone_penetration

See here :

https://qz.com/india/1512867/reliance-jios-cheap-data-is-killing-broadband-internet-in-india/

"Despite the slowing growth, India’s broadband subscriber base did breach the 500 million milestone in 2018. "

Kartik Gada

Geoman,

Actually, here is the roll-up of total mobile broadband subscribers :

https://www.statista.com/statistics/273016/number-of-mobile-broadband-subscriptions-worldwide-since-2007/

2013 had almost 2 billion worldwide, so Asia + LatAm comprising over 900m out of that is a certainty.

The scalability advantage of mobile was always going to be a factor in its rapid diffusion over landlines, under ATOM principles.

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